Objectification in advertising

Objectification and Sexism in Advertising

Ah, the 1950s: what a delightful era. It brought us Elvis Presley, hula hoops, poodle skirts, drive-in movies, and of course, the golden age of television. As the television industry boomed, so did the advertising industry, what with the added reach that television allowed. TV also provided a superb outlet for sexism in ads, which had already proven to be wildly popular in print ads for decades. Objectification in the advertising industry is an old hat it would seem, as women have continued to be advertised as everything from the dutiful housewife to the dutiful bedroom partner ever since those first sexist ads appeared in print. But this is 2018, you say! The sexist ads of old simply would not fly in our enlightened age! And yet, here we are.
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Video Games Sexism

A Thorn in the Side: The Case of Sexism in Video Games

Contrary to the popular belief that people who play video games are predominantly male, women actually make up nearly half of the world’s gaming population. Since such a large piece of video game profits come from women, it’s surprising that not only are women grossly misrepresented in video games, there is also a shocking amount of sexism and sexualization in the industry.
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Drive in Saudi Arabia

Women To Be Finally Allowed to Drive in Saudi Arabia

It’s official: King Salman has officially announced that women will be allowed to drive in Saudi Arabia for the first time ever, but not until June 2018. This proclamation is will not be put into effect until June of next year, and in the meantime they will have to still be chaperoned by a mahram; a male relative. 
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Sexist Cartoons

Sexist Cartoons: A Tale of Princesses, Patriarchy and Pedophilia

Let’s talk about sexist cartoons. Art is always a product of its time, meaning that anything creative, especially mainstream arts, have been influenced heavily by the time they were created in. We have previously looked at racial stereotypes in classic cartoons, as well as war propaganda (with and without racial stereotypes), but that is not all there is to see.
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