Quarantine in Pakistan

Quarantine and What It Means for Pakistan

In collaboration with Anam Jalil Sheik

The upper middle class and elite of Pakistan lounge in appropriately furnished homes with full fridges and a large bag of chips next to them while they worriedly watch the news about increasing cases of COVID-19. Amongst these people are those who have a fixed salary and are somewhat relieved that they are getting two weeks off without doing any work, those who work from home, and those who have enough money to last them a few generations and aren’t really concerned about not being able to step outdoors for a few days. Most of these people are using their free time to catch up on their favorite shows, to message crushes and potential future partners and to strengthen their dating/flirting game.

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Pakistani mobile phone

Is it viral? Video and Barbarianism

Lawyers protest by storming into a hospital in Lahore, Pakistan.

Pakistan, a country previously climbing the ladder of development at a snail’s pace, is now progressing very quickly with an increase in the literacy rate, a decrease in terrorist activity, and perhaps a better standard of living for some social classes. Additionally, the number of people in the country using the internet is now at a massive 35.1 million, and 25 million Facebook users. 

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Mocha Uson and Rodrigo Duterte

The Fault in Mocha Uson’s Logic: Attacks in the Wrong Places

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte currently caught the ire of most citizens again when he kissed a woman on the lips on live television. This coincides with his previous issues on rape remarks that by now should have been enough to make him remember that anything related to him and women is pretty sensitive. Then came Kris Aquino and Mocha Uson.
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Israel and the Rohingya genocide

Israel: An Ally to the Rohingya Genocide in Myanmar?

As per “The Countdown to Annihilation: Genocide in Myanmar” by Penny Green, Thomas MacManus and Alicia de la Cour Venning: “The first President of Burma, Sao Shwe Thaike, a Shan, claimed in 1959 that the ‘Muslims of Arakan certainly belong to the indigenous races of Burma. If they do not belong to the indigenous races, we also cannot be taken as indigenous races”.
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Violence against women in Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea: Warzone of Violence Against Women

In November 2017, in the Northern Highlands of Egna, a six-year-old girl was burned and cut after being accused of witchcraft by her community. Her mother had died 3 years prior as a result of being publicly set on fire, burning to death in Mount Hagen. No one has been prosecuted for these crimes. While this case is shocking and deplorable, sadly it is unlikely to shock the women of Papua New Guinea where violence against women and a system designed to oppress them is still flourishing.
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Rodrigo Duterte

The Duterte Effect: When Idolatry Becomes Too Much

The Philippines finally got a good chance at becoming one of the fastest growing countries in Asia. Surveys show that crime rates are lower — though International Courts have questioned the legitimacy — and the economy is seen as booming. And just recently, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte was named one the most powerful men in the world.
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Sex tourism in the Philippines

Prostitution and Sex Tourism in the Philippines

Whilst finding exact numbers can be difficult, most sources estimate that 500,000 to 800,000 men, women and children are working in the sex trade in the Philippines. Sex tourism is mainly clustered around the major cities; however, its effects are felt countrywide where women and children are often forced or coerced away from their rural communities to work in the cities. Selling or paying for sex is actually illegal in the Philippines, however sex workers will be employed as a number of different roles that fall under ‘Entertainment’. Law enforcement turns a blind eye, and often accept bribes from sex workers in the form of sexual favors in order for their continued compliance with the industry.
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Kunduz massacre

Kunduz Massacre: Ploy To Grab Afghanistan’s Mineral Riches?

They say that the smallest coffins are the heaviest. Before you decide to deny this, imagine how you would feel in the shoes of those who have had to bury their young before themselves. Every parent wants to wake up and send their child to school early in the morning for something as special as a Graduation Day. Sounds pretty special, doesn’t it? Every parents dreams of the day their child graduates from middle school or high school but never in their wildest dreams do they picture their child coming home in pieces.

Where is Kunduz?

Kunduz is located close to the Afghan Border that connects to Tajikistan. This city widely became famous once it was overtook by the Taliban in September of 2015 once NATO’s ISAF was led by the US. Since 2015, Kunduz has seen many dark days but it was only in April of 2018 that it saw the darkest day that it had ever seen.

Graduation or Funeral?

On April 12th, Kunduz Province in Afghanistan suffered through a deadly school massacre that killed and injured many innocent young souls. This school was an education center to many kids under the age of 10. It was graduation day in this school in Dasht-e-Archi District of Kunduz Province when the United States bombed not only the school but also the homes of several innocent civilians which ended up killing over 250 Afghan/Pashtun kids, teachers, parents and villagers. This is nothing new for the people living in these villages as war crimes like the Kunduz massacre have become a dangerous norm for them.

On February 24th of 2018, U.S forces bombed yet another school and civilian homes in the village of Bala Baluk in the Farah Province of Afghanistan killing over 10 civilians and children. And before that on November 20th of 2017, several Afghani villagers reported 21 students including children massacred by the United States Special Ops in alliance with the Afghan Puppet Administration from the Maidan Wardak Province.

REEs More Important Than Innocent Children

United States General Nicholson tells the media that these airstrikes taking place in Afghanistan are targeted towards drug labs and has more to do with controlling REEs than terrorism. But if the complete facts of the case remain hidden from the general populace, how much of it can we really believe?

Afghanistan’s lands holds many treasures along with copper, iron, cobalt, sulfur, lead, barite, silver, zinc and niobium. But what really matters to the United States government is that Afghanistan’s land holds 1.4 million tons of REEs which is short for rare-earth elements. These deposits are vast and potentially untapped which explains why foreign governments are so attracted to it. These are situated near the Helmand Province in Afghanistan among other places and that is precisely why the U.S government cannot leave it alone.

Media Turns a Blind Eye to the Kunduz Massacre

Whatever happens in Afghanistan goes vastly unnoticed by the media eye and that is why most people never find out about chemical attacks and such. The attack that took place on April 12th in Kunduz that is now being referred to as the Kunduz Massacre was only one in a list of many things the Afghan Pushtuns have had to suffer through.

Wouldn’t You Do The Same?

Why the Afghan Pushtuns, you ask? They are the sole barrier standing in the way of Trump and the richness of Afghanistan’s lands. They are fiercely fighting to protect their land. So the theory so far is that the United States government is bombing their villages to get rid of their road blocks, so to speak.

We Condemn It

But at what cost, I ask? These innocent souls, what was their fault that they had to die this way? These illegal attacks must stop. The people who are responsible for committing attacks like the Kunduz massacre should be legally tried for their actions. If in a court of law, they can prove themselves, only then should they walk free. But anyone who harms innocent children, should not be considered one of us and most certainly should not be in a position of authority.

China Africa Neocolonialism Trade

African Neocolonialism: Is China Exploiting Africa?

Colonialism has shaped Africa in a multitude of ways. The scramble for Africa in the late 19th century caused traditional values and culture to give way to European influence and ideals, deforming the African identity through exploitation. This impact is felt until today, as the continent struggles to bounce back and embrace its wealth of natural resources to advance independently without relying on foreign aid. China has been the most active player in providing services, import and export goods, and investments on the African continent, in a move that many describe as neocolonialism, implying exploitation and an increase of power at the expense of the African people.
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